What Are Huffy Bikes?

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Huffy bikes have been on the cycling scene for over a century. Collectors go crazy over the old school classics for their retro appeal.

They’re still one of the biggest names in the business today — producing some popular modern styles. Whether you prefer cruising, luxury rides, hitting the mountains, or riding with your kids, they have something for you.

Let’s get the scoop on Huffies!

What are Huffy bikes? Today, we’re talking all about them, including:

  • History of Huffy.
  • The current Huffy bikes available.
  • How much is a Huffy worth?
  • Where the new generation is made.
  • What size bike do I need?

huffy bikes infographic

What Are Huffy Bikes?

Their ethos, “We make fun” has pedaled the bikes Huffy make into the 21st century. For many, this bicycle brand is a household name and a favored choice of two wheels.

They’ve played a massive part in revolutionizing the cycling market over the years. If you learned to ride before balance bikes came about, it’s highly likely you’ve got the Huffman’s to thank — more on that later.

Let’s take a brief look at their resumé:

History of Huffy

With over 125 years in the business, these guys shouldn’t be short on experience. Their bicycle-making journey began in the 1890s, when Goerge Huffman, the owner of a sewing machine company, noticed how the bicycle craze was taking over. He spotted a business opportunity.

He decided to shift his company to producing bikes, and by 1924, the company rebranded as Huffman Bicycles. The shop only got busier from there.

However, when World War II rocked the globe, the brand decided to change tactics —  they began creating military bikes and artillery shell primers to help with the war effort.

The year 1949 was another major milestone in the Huffman timeline. The company invented the “Convertible bike” — a kids cycle which included removable training wheels (aka stabilizers) — the first-ever of it’s kind.

Throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s as the popularity of cycling grew, so did they, even outperforming the major leaguers of Schwinn bikes. In 1979, they produced bike number 30M — which you can see in the National Museum of American History.

The 1984 summer Olympics in Los Angeles was another momentous occasion for the business. The US team scooped two gold, one silver and a bronze medal in time trials and the men and women’s road race — riding Huffy bikes.

Since then, the brand has made strides on the scene, always bringing new, unique bicycles to their shop — as you’re about to find out.

Huffy Bicycle Types

With such an impressive background, can Huffy live up to their name? Here are the cycles you may find available in your local shop.

  • Comfort bikes—offered for adults in men’s and women-specific designs. The upright ride position and comfy seat make for an easy-leisure-rider.
  • Cruiser bikes—as the name suggests, this cycle is made for cruising around on two-wheels — while you take in the sights and sounds. Available men’s and women’s. 
  • Mountain bikes—with varying types of suspension and gearing options, these bikes are for those who love off-road adventure. 
  • Kids’ bikes—there’s plenty of choice for the tiny rider. Mountain, BMX, balance bikes, and a modern take on their “Convertible bike.”
  • Electric bikes—cyclists who want pedal-assistance-power — the e-bike range includes mountain and comfort models.

vintage bike bicycle old

FAQs

Are Huffy Bikes Good?”

In my opinion, the bikes Huffy make offers possibilities for commuting, cruising around town, and casual mountain biking.

Leisure riders may love the retro-centric style of this bicycle brand. The seat style — slightly further back than average — contributes to the comfort of the machine by shifting the center of gravity.

For those who crave vintage products, you can shop for old bikes Huffy created on eBay, which include interesting models such as the RadioBike (which had a built-in AM radio), the Sigma (a BMX-type), and various “banana seat” models.

How Much Is A Huffy Bike Worth?”

If you shop for second-hand Huffy products of the modern generation, you’ll find it’s tricky to put a price on them. Wear and tear, plus mass production, influence the value.

In contrast, vintage Huffy bikes can fetch quite a price in a specialized shop, as they may be collector’s items.

Establishing the age is a good place to start your price valuation. To date your Huffy cycle, take the first digit from the serial number to determine the year. Key features and tire width identify the decade.

Where are Huffy Bikes Made?”

The bikes were US-made, with the occasional bike Huffy made coming out of Japan or England. However, since 1999, new cycles are manufactured in China and Mexico.

What Size Bike Do I Need?

Choosing the right-sized bicycle is necessary to keep you comfortable on the ride and reduce the chances of injury.

The most important part is getting the right sized frame for you — from there, everything else can be adjusted to make the bicycle more comfortable for you. The frame is NOT adjustable — which explains why it’s so essential to get this right!

Here’s how to find out what size bicycle you need:

  1. Measure your inseam.

Stand against a wall with your feet 6 inches apart. Measure from the floor to your groin in inches.

  1. Multiply by 0.67.

This will give you the frame size.

For mountain bicycles, you’ll want to measure the top tube — just take the seat tube measurement and multiply by 0.67, then minus four inches.

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Huffy Bikes Conclusion

Huffy bikes have been around for eons, and they’re still as popular as ever among commuters, casual bikers, luxury riders or leisurely mountain bikers.

Their retro style is eye-catching and unique, and they’re built for comfortable riding. There’s so much behind these classic bikes that owning a Huffy is like owning a piece of history!

 

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